Tuesday, November 14, 2006

In Which The Author Polls Her Readers On The Originality of Powers

Gentle Reader, what's your superpower?

Of course, I don't mean What's Your Superpower, but rather, if you were to have one, what would it be?

A silly question, perhaps, but I think the things we desire say a lot about us, as fans. Even further, the things we like, we appreciate, we *fandom* say even more.

Or, to wit, which of the existing superpowers do you think is the most interesting?

As you all know by now, I adore The Amazon Princess. But if I had to pick The Most Interesting Superpower, The Scarlet Witch's wins, every time. Control of probability? What in Heaven's name does that mean, anyhow? I'm not sure, but damn, do I want it.

Think of the possibilities. I could win the lottery *every day*. One percent chance of a cure for cancer? Done. .001% chance that cheesecake is no longer fattening? Welcome to My Perfect World.

But in all seriousness, we've seen strength, and flights, and tights, and telepathy. We've seen laser beams and perfect aim and sonic screams. But *control over probability* is just smart. Too damn smart for words.

I am currently working on a prose comic-book-type thing (which doesn't really mean anything at all, understand!), and in working on this piece, I marveled over the sheer originality of The Big Two of the publishing houses (the originality, I must admit, that I found sorely lacking in my own attempts). To wit, I wondered how Marvel came up with The Scarlet Witch's power? And how did DC come up with Black Canary's sonic scream? Both so fascinating, and so original, it all seemed too fantastical for words, and yet... and yet, it works. It's smart, it's original, and it very much works.

So tell me, Friends. In honor of originality, in homage to creativity, what do you think is the neatest, most original, perhaps, superpower out there?

35 Comments:

At 11:33 PM, Blogger Shelly said...

I've always liked invisibility and invulnerability. Being a clutz, I would find invulnerability particularly useful.

 
At 12:13 AM, Blogger Loren said...

While I'm a DC fan, the super powers I would have is definitely those possessed by Ms. Kitty Pryde. I'd love to be able to walk through walls and pass through people (especially when I'm at the book store and people are in my way!). And, hey, if I ever wanted to kill somebody (you know, being a pacifist and all), I could phase my hand into somebody's chest, solidify and rip their heart out. ;)

 
At 8:57 AM, Blogger Matthew E said...

Most original superpower... that's tough. Very few comic-book superpowers seem that original anymore. I'm not even that jazzed about the Scarlet Witch; to me, it just sounds like they wanted a pseudoscientific way of saying 'magic'. Similarly, with Black Canary, well... once they've decided a) to name her after a singing bird and b) to give her superpowers, there were only a few ways to go, and I guess they didn't want her to be able to fly. Some of the most original superpowers I've run into have been in the Wild Cards books: Fortunato's tantric magic, Cap'n Trips's drug-induced multiple identities, Popinjay's projective teleportation...

By the way, I'd like to hear more about your prose-comic-book thing; I like superhero-related prose and have in fact written some myself (here, if you're interested; it's annoying to navigate but I like to think it's not without its virtues).

The superpower I'd find most useful to have is almost certainly teleportation, but the problem with most superpowers is that it's hard to use them responsibly. Think of how much trouble you could get into if you had telepathy, for instance, or even your 'probability control'.

The superpower I'd probably choose if I got to choose one is immortality. I figure if I'm immortal I can take my chances on everything else.

But the one I'd most like to have has got to be flight. Because of all the superpowers, that's the only one I can think of that would be fun to use independent of what's being accomplished with it.

 
At 1:51 PM, Blogger Sarah said...

Of possible interest to the Victorian scholar: http://littleprofessor.typepad.com/the_little_professor/2006/11/death_of_a_ster.html

And for Matthew who wishes to be immortal, have you read Douglas Adams? He has a character who becomes immortal, enjoys generally out-living the hell out of everyone for a few decades, then gets bored and sets out to personally insult everyone in the universe in alphabetical order. It's the Sunday afternoons that really get to him...

 
At 1:53 PM, Blogger Sarah said...

Let me try that link again with some html:

The Little Professor

 
At 3:09 PM, Blogger Matthew E said...

I remember that. And I concede the point. But, given the choice between being bored and being dead...

 
At 4:02 PM, Blogger Ragtime said...

My superpower would be invisibility because I am nosy.

My second superpower would be the one where Flash can slip into the speedforce and it seems like everything is moving in super slo-mo. Then I could get a lot done.

I would not use any of my superpowers responsibly, but would immediate corrupt them for personal gain.

Then I would need my third superpower. Invulnerability to guilt.

Hm. Maybe that should be my first one.

 
At 4:39 PM, Blogger Lyle said...

I always loved The Scarlet Witch as a kid and, when I was in my pen & paper RPG phase, I tried to create magic spells and superpowers that worked that way (a simple mechanic -- reverse the roll table so that a to get the result of a 1-4 roll you'd need a 5 or 6 instead).

The last "neat" superpower I can think of was Voodoo Dolly from Adam Warren's Gen13 run. She could displace effects on her body to other people... a power that could be horribly abused. She'd prank her friends by drinking and having the alcohol affect them (I think she tried it at one point on Rainmaker, which is sorta date-rape) and, in her one action scene, turned a gun on herself several times (shooting her foes instead). That was one of those kinda-cool, kinda-disturbing moments.

The powers aren't new as much wrapped in a new package, but I always like Jack Hawksmoor who had special powers in cities, including an empathic sense for cities.

Of course, my thought was that I could eat cheesecake and send the calories to someone else! Now if only I could get that power to reverse and steal the effects of some workouts.

When I took a stab at superhero fiction for a fiction newsgroup, I came up with two unusual powers I liked. One was a guy who could transfer mental energy, helping someone concentrate while making another mind unfocused. One of their eventual villains was a guy who's power was innoticability. Not invisibility, people could see him, but their minds always ended up finding him unimportant and looking elsewhere. He was mostly a shoplifter and a blackmailer.

 
At 6:29 PM, Blogger Fanboy said...

This is a question I considered a lot in my youth. If you asked me tomorrow, you'd get different answers. Answers - that's right. I can't choose just one. I can't think of this as one power, so instead am looking at est. heroes. I know, I broke the rules.

Aquaman: I like the idea of lording over 70% of the living space on the planet. Sounds like fun to me. I think my love of the sea came from him, hence my SCUBA for fun and my previous life working at an aquarium.

Storm: Weather control would be so useful!

Dazzler: I like the idea of transforing noise into light powers. As of late they've expanded the breadth of her powers to include holograms, flight, etc. making me like her more.

Kitty Pryde: I agree with most others. Phasing is cool.

Beast Boy/Changeling: I love the idea of turning into animals (Mich cooler than Vixen taking on their traits, IMHO).

Detective Chimp: I like the idea of talking monkeys. I find them hilarious. As such, I would want to be the guy that makes everyone else laugh (with not at).

 
At 6:50 PM, Blogger Matthew E said...

When I took a stab at superhero fiction for a fiction newsgroup, I came up with two unusual powers I liked. [...] One of their eventual villains was a guy who's power was innoticability. Not invisibility, people could see him, but their minds always ended up finding him unimportant and looking elsewhere.

Well, there are three kinds of invisibility, basically: physical, optical and psychic. Physical invisibility is the one where light goes right through you like you weren't there. Optical invisibility is the one where you aren't transparent, but somehow bend the light around you. Yours is the third one, psychic invisibility. In some ways it's better; in some ways it's not as useful.

 
At 2:30 PM, Blogger Amy Reads said...

Hi Shelly,
I've always liked invisibility and invulnerability. Being a clutz, I would find invulnerability particularly useful.

I, too, am a klutz. "Tuesday's child is full of grace" feels more like a curse for me...
Ciao,
Amy

 
At 2:31 PM, Blogger Amy Reads said...

Hi Loren,
While I'm a DC fan, the super powers I would have is definitely those possessed by Ms. Kitty Pryde. I'd love to be able to walk through walls and pass through people (especially when I'm at the book store and people are in my way!).

I adore Ms. Pryde as well, particularly her run with Mr. Whedon (how I adore the Kitty/Piotr pairing!)

And, hey, if I ever wanted to kill somebody (you know, being a pacifist and all), I could phase my hand into somebody's chest, solidify and rip their heart out. ;)

!!!
*ahem*
I am going to never, ever piss you off.
:)
Ciao,
Amy

 
At 2:41 PM, Blogger Amy Reads said...

Hi Matthew,
Most original superpower... that's tough. Very few comic-book superpowers seem that original anymore. I'm not even that jazzed about the Scarlet Witch; to me, it just sounds like they wanted a pseudoscientific way of saying 'magic'.

It is that. Mr. Reads pointed the same thing out to me, but doesn't SW have more control than, say, Zatanna? That it's perhaps the most intense form of magic?

Similarly, with Black Canary, well... once they've decided a) to name her after a singing bird and b) to give her superpowers, there were only a few ways to go, and I guess they didn't want her to be able to fly.

The flight thing is really curious to me. Did you see the episode of Heroes in which they discussed the "benefits" of flight? Really, really interesting.

Some of the most original superpowers I've run into have been in the Wild Cards books: Fortunato's tantric magic, Cap'n Trips's drug-induced multiple identities, Popinjay's projective teleportation...

I haven't read these, but they sound neat. I'll check it out :)

By the way, I'd like to hear more about your prose-comic-book thing; I like superhero-related prose and have in fact written some myself (here, if you're interested; it's annoying to navigate but I like to think it's not without its virtues).

Thanks for the link! I poked around a little bit, but I look forward to reading more when the semester dies down.
My prose-comic-book thing is my idea for a comic book, but since I can't draw or write comics, I decided to do it as a novel. The first draft's almost done, but, well, dissertations happen, so...
It's a world in which many, many people have superpowers, but they're essentially illegal, and thus you can't really save the day without worrying about the police showing up. But that's not the story; the story is, as all of my stories are, a character piece following a few particular people in this world.
:)

The superpower I'd find most useful to have is almost certainly teleportation, but the problem with most superpowers is that it's hard to use them responsibly. Think of how much trouble you could get into if you had telepathy, for instance, or even your 'probability control'.

Very, very true. Again, I think you're the one who initially recommended Heroes to me, and I find that it's treating these issues very well.

The superpower I'd probably choose if I got to choose one is immortality. I figure if I'm immortal I can take my chances on everything else.

*shudder* I wouldn't want to live forever. Didn't you see the end of Alias? :)

But the one I'd most like to have has got to be flight. Because of all the superpowers, that's the only one I can think of that would be fun to use independent of what's being accomplished with it.

I'm actually scared of heights and flying in planes, so the flight thing isn't my cup of tea. But teleportation sounds great, as does speed (I do so love my Flash).
Ciao,
Amy

 
At 2:42 PM, Blogger Amy Reads said...

Hi Sarah,
Of possible interest to the Victorian scholar:

Huzzah! Thanks for the link. Very interesting read. It's bookmarked :)
Ciao,
Amy

 
At 2:44 PM, Blogger Amy Reads said...

Hi Ragtime,
My superpower would be invisibility because I am nosy.

:) It does seem like a convenient power for the nosy people (of which I am very much one).

My second superpower would be the one where Flash can slip into the speedforce and it seems like everything is moving in super slo-mo. Then I could get a lot done.

You definitely could, but you wouldn't be able to listen to music very well (which is sometimes essential for getting work done). And pouring coffee would take forever, no? ;)

I would not use any of my superpowers responsibly, but would immediate corrupt them for personal gain.

*mental note: never piss of Ragtime OR Loren*

Then I would need my third superpower. Invulnerability to guilt.Hm. Maybe that should be my first one.

I'm Catholic. There's no such thing for me, unfortunately.
Ciao,
Amy

 
At 2:47 PM, Blogger Amy Reads said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

 
At 2:47 PM, Blogger Amy Reads said...

Hi Lyle,
I always loved The Scarlet Witch as a kid and, when I was in my pen & paper RPG phase, I tried to create magic spells and superpowers that worked that way (a simple mechanic -- reverse the roll table so that a to get the result of a 1-4 roll you'd need a 5 or 6 instead).

I am about to play my first RPG game! I am very excited.
Sorry, this has nothing to do with your comment, but that's about all I know about RPG games: that I'm going to play one.

The last "neat" superpower I can think of was Voodoo Dolly from Adam Warren's Gen13 run. She could displace effects on her body to other people... a power that could be horribly abused. She'd prank her friends by drinking and having the alcohol affect them (I think she tried it at one point on Rainmaker, which is sorta date-rape) and, in her one action scene, turned a gun on herself several times (shooting her foes instead). That was one of those kinda-cool, kinda-disturbing moments.

Egad, that is neat, but very, very scary. I haven't read Gen13. worth checking out?

The powers aren't new as much wrapped in a new package, but I always like Jack Hawksmoor who had special powers in cities, including an empathic sense for cities.

Very, *very* neat.

Of course, my thought was that I could eat cheesecake and send the calories to someone else! Now if only I could get that power to reverse and steal the effects of some workouts.

And you could even use that power for good, by sending calories to people who don't get enough food. We could end starvation across the globe...

When I took a stab at superhero fiction for a fiction newsgroup, I came up with two unusual powers I liked. One was a guy who could transfer mental energy, helping someone concentrate while making another mind unfocused.

Very cool! How did it work, specifically?

One of their eventual villains was a guy who's power was innoticability. Not invisibility, people could see him, but their minds always ended up finding him unimportant and looking elsewhere. He was mostly a shoplifter and a blackmailer.

Neat :) I have a character who can't be picked up by surveillance equipment, or cameras, or film. Sort of the same sort of thing, but specific to technology.
Ciao,
Amy

 
At 2:53 PM, Blogger Amy Reads said...

Hi Mr. Fanboy,
This is a question I considered a lot in my youth. If you asked me tomorrow, you'd get different answers. Answers - that's right. I can't choose just one. I can't think of this as one power, so instead am looking at est. heroes. I know, I broke the rules.

You never have to choose just one! Give us your entire list :)

Aquaman: I like the idea of lording over 70% of the living space on the planet. Sounds like fun to me. I think my love of the sea came from him, hence my SCUBA for fun and my previous life working at an aquarium.

I'd love to see Aquaman done in an interesting way, although Mr. Reads said the recent run, at least the beginning, was neat. Any thoughts?

Storm: Weather control would be so useful!

I'd make it rain too much, I think :)

Dazzler: I like the idea of transforing noise into light powers. As of late they've expanded the breadth of her powers to include holograms, flight, etc. making me like her more.

I don't know this Dazzler! Who is she? She sounds fabulous.

Kitty Pryde: I agree with most others. Phasing is cool.

And Kitty is cool.

Beast Boy/Changeling: I love the idea of turning into animals (Mich cooler than Vixen taking on their traits, IMHO).

True, but I find Vixen neat in a million different ways, you know?

Detective Chimp: I like the idea of talking monkeys. I find them hilarious. As such, I would want to be the guy that makes everyone else laugh (with not at).

Talking monkeys scare the bejeesus out of me. No idea why...
Ciao,
Amy

 
At 4:10 PM, Blogger Matthew E said...

doesn't SW have more control than, say, Zatanna?

If that's the way they want to write it, she does. If not, not. It's magic, after all.

Did you see the episode of Heroes in which they discussed the "benefits" of flight?

I must have, but I don't remember that part.

I haven't read [the Wild Cards books], but they sound neat. I'll check it out :)

Best superhero prose fiction ever written. Your only trouble might be finding them. Although the first six books (there have been, altogether, seventeen, and there are going to be three more starting next year) have been reprinted recently. I like the whole series, but many people found that it went downhill after the first seven. Note: if you read the first book and don't like it, don't give up on the series; the first book isn't representative.

I wouldn't want to live forever. Didn't you see the end of Alias? :)

No, never saw Alias. My position is that being dead is preferable to so few things that it's hard for immortality not to be a good deal.

I am about to play my first RPG game! I am very excited.

Neat. Which one?

RPGs and analysis of superpowers go together quite well; it was the time I spent as a Champions GM that eventually resulted in this post. If you don't know it, Champions is the most flexible superhero RPG: there is no such thing as a superpower that the game rules can't simulate. (Which is not to say that your character can have that superpower, necessarily...)

And: Dazzler.

 
At 5:21 PM, Blogger Fanboy said...

Dazzler was the roller-skate wearing mutant when she first debuted. She's somewhat unique in that she always eschewed being a hero in favor of being a performer. She was introduced smack dab in the middle of the Phoenix Saga. Her solo run lasted 40 + issues. She eventually joined the X-Men for their stint in the Outback and now she's over in New Excalibur after being in character limbo for years (but now with pink hair - don't ask). There is also an Ultimate X-Men verion of her, but she just left the team after Nightcrawler did some nasty things to her. I posted pix on my blog at http://misterfanboy.blogspot.com/2006/11/dazzler-for-amy.html
for you, starting with her "classic" look through today, and then the Ultimate version (UXM Annual #2 - which was an awesome issue; yes she's supposed to be upside down with Kurt).

I don't know that I am the best person to ask about Aquaman. I tend to like them even when most don't since I love the character so much. I am intriqued by the new take (although yet another new writer is on the way), though not as much as the previous one where San Diego was sunk and many of the survivors were turned into water breathers, whom our hero "protected."

BTW, Did you read the new BoP. I liked it a lot. Haven't gotten to Catwomen yet.

 
At 7:21 PM, Blogger Lyle said...

I haven't read Gen13. worth checking out?

Well, overall I'd say no. Gen13, for the most part, is a cheesecake book without much more to offer.

However, Adam Warren's Gen13's work tends to be very smart and hip, throwing around pop culutre references with a lot of imagination. My first exposure to his work was a two-issue fill-in story where Caitlin Fairchild is the only one who can resist a catch pop song that threatens to take over the world.

He did two Gen13 mini-series -- Grunge: The Movie (which I haven't read) and Magical Girl Roxy (where Roxanne has a dream of being a Sailor Moon-style magical girl, the best line comes when Sarah Rainmaker realizes she's been cast as a villain in this dream and screams "What is this, a Joe Esterhaus movie!").

He was the last writer for the series until it got revamped under Chris Claremont (yeah, that's a good way to revive a title). The first few issues were kinda slow but got really, really good after an issue guest-starring the Authority. Aside from the humor, one of the run's notable aspects was how Warren turned Sarah Rainmaker, formerly a lesbian with "Girl on girl action! Hawt!" characterization, into a fully-considered character without tossing earlier characterization.

Under Warren, the series was still cheesecake but in kind of a smart way (Warren worked in an Andrea Dworkin punchline early on) the quality improved when Ed Benes wasn't working on the art (IMO, Benes is one of those cheesecake artists who put more detail into drawing women than men, unlike Rick Mays and Yannick Paquette who also did art chores.)

As for the guy who could transfer mental energy, he basically would make it harder or easier for supers to use their powers, except that there were dangers in going so far (hence, since he could only move that energy, he had to be careful not to overload his recipent, which we see happen early on).

 
At 10:03 PM, Blogger je m'amuse said...

I think that reading minds would come in handy. Of course, this is a superpower that my children assume I already possess. It's a pity I can't live up to it.

 
At 10:27 PM, Blogger Amy Reads said...

Hi Matthew,
If that's the way they want to write it, she does. If not, not. It's magic, after all.

Magic is as magic does, no? And with SW, she's scary. Didn't she find some non-mutant probability world or something? (I hear all of the Marvel gossip via Mr. Reads, you realize)

Did you see the episode of Heroes in which they discussed the "benefits" of flight?
I must have, but I don't remember that part.


Peter's brother asks him what he can possibly do by flying, i.e. that flying was pretty useless as far as powers went.

Best superhero prose fiction ever written. Your only trouble might be finding them. Although the first six books (there have been, altogether, seventeen, and there are going to be three more starting next year) have been reprinted recently. I like the whole series, but many people found that it went downhill after the first seven. Note: if you read the first book and don't like it, don't give up on the series; the first book isn't representative.

It's very possible Mr. Reads has them Somewhere In The World. I'll look into it. Thanks! :)

that being dead is preferable to so few things that it's hard for immortality not to be a good deal.

I don't know. I think Sundays would get to me, too ;)

I am about to play my first RPG game! I am very excited.
Neat. Which one?


Serenity. Mr. Reads and several of his (male) friends D&D, and they're looking to start a different game. When Serenity came on the board, I said I wanted in. I am going to be the only woman playing, which is sort of strange, but since I'm 1) one of the only women of my acquaintance that likes Firefly and Serenity, and 2) one of the only women of my acquaintance that's child-free, it's not *that* weird. Plus, you know, these are my boys. They played D&D in my living room every week for a year. I *miss* having them around.

RPGs and analysis of superpowers go together quite well; it was the time I spent as a Champions GM that eventually resulted in this post. If you don't know it, Champions is the most flexible superhero RPG: there is no such thing as a superpower that the game rules can't simulate. (Which is not to say that your character can have that superpower, necessarily...)

Mr. Reads played Champions, and the boys were going to have a Champions game, but opted for Serenity instead (in part, I think, for me to play which is just Quite Sweet).

And: Dazzler.

Thanks! I want to find her, forthwith.
Ciao,
Amy

 
At 10:30 PM, Blogger Amy Reads said...

Hi Mr. Fanboy,
Dazzler was the roller-skate wearing mutant when she first debuted. She's somewhat unique in that she always eschewed being a hero in favor of being a performer. She was introduced smack dab in the middle of the Phoenix Saga. Her solo run lasted 40 + issues. She eventually joined the X-Men for their stint in the Outback and now she's over in New Excalibur after being in character limbo for years (but now with pink hair - don't ask). There is also an Ultimate X-Men verion of her, but she just left the team after Nightcrawler did some nasty things to her. I posted pix on my blog at http://misterfanboy.blogspot.com/2006/11/dazzler-for-amy.html
for you, starting with her "classic" look through today, and then the Ultimate version (UXM Annual #2 - which was an awesome issue; yes she's supposed to be upside down with Kurt).


Huzzah! A post and pictures all for me! I *adore* her. Can't wait to read her! Thanks :)

I don't know that I am the best person to ask about Aquaman. I tend to like them even when most don't since I love the character so much. I am intriqued by the new take (although yet another new writer is on the way), though not as much as the previous one where San Diego was sunk and many of the survivors were turned into water breathers, whom our hero "protected."

I just can't get over the "Great job, Minnow!" era of Aquaman. Scarred, perhaps. not sure...

BTW, Did you read the new BoP. I liked it a lot. Haven't gotten to Catwomen yet.

Haven't had a chance for either yet. I'm still getting caught up over the past two weeks. I'm going to use the Thanksgiving holiday to get caught up on the diss AND my comic reading.
Ciao,
Amy

 
At 10:34 PM, Blogger Amy Reads said...

Hi Lyle,
Well, overall I'd say no. Gen13, for the most part, is a cheesecake book without much more to offer.
However, Adam Warren's Gen13's work tends to be very smart and hip, throwing around pop culutre references with a lot of imagination. My first exposure to his work was a two-issue fill-in story where Caitlin Fairchild is the only one who can resist a catch pop song that threatens to take over the world.


!!! Sounds like something to read on a plane or in some other moment for pure eye candy :)

He did two Gen13 mini-series -- Grunge: The Movie (which I haven't read) and Magical Girl Roxy (where Roxanne has a dream of being a Sailor Moon-style magical girl, the best line comes when Sarah Rainmaker realizes she's been cast as a villain in this dream and screams "What is this, a Joe Esterhaus movie!").

What fun! Cheesecake is good, too, you know :)

He was the last writer for the series until it got revamped under Chris Claremont (yeah, that's a good way to revive a title). The first few issues were kinda slow but got really, really good after an issue guest-starring the Authority. Aside from the humor, one of the run's notable aspects was how Warren turned Sarah Rainmaker, formerly a lesbian with "Girl on girl action! Hawt!" characterization, into a fully-considered character without tossing earlier characterization.

Wonderful! I'm more and more intrigued!

Under Warren, the series was still cheesecake but in kind of a smart way (Warren worked in an Andrea Dworkin punchline early on) the quality improved when Ed Benes wasn't working on the art (IMO, Benes is one of those cheesecake artists who put more detail into drawing women than men, unlike Rick Mays and Yannick Paquette who also did art chores.)

I'm going to check it out, despite your initial warning. Thanks :)

As for the guy who could transfer mental energy, he basically would make it harder or easier for supers to use their powers, except that there were dangers in going so far (hence, since he could only move that energy, he had to be careful not to overload his recipent, which we see happen early on).

That sounds just super smart in a million ways. I can't help but think how hard it is to come up with original, non-cheesy powers, you know?
Ciao,
Amy

 
At 10:35 PM, Blogger Amy Reads said...

Hi Je M'Amuse,
I think that reading minds would come in handy. Of course, this is a superpower that my children assume I already possess. It's a pity I can't live up to it.

Your own children, or your students? I can imagine both would find it a frightening skill, one both parents and teachers have in spades ;)
(and pretend! who needs superpowers when the threat of them work just as well??)
Ciao,
Amy

 
At 8:27 AM, Blogger je m'amuse said...

Amy,

There are moments when the assumption of being a mind-reader comes in handy, no doubt! It's a superpower that I've used as both parent and teacher.

My experience has been that some kids tend to think that adults are omniscient. My theory is that it's kind of like playing peek-a-boo with a baby who hasn't acquired an awareness of permanance yet. Not sure if that makes sense to you . . Maybe it has something to do with the ego and the sense of being the center of the universe.

 
At 3:39 PM, Blogger Lyle said...

Just to clarify, I'd recommend Adam Warren's Gen-13 run, I'd mostly warn about the bulk of Gen-13 which was by Brandon Choi and Scott Campbell and is (part of) the basis for the stereotypical Image comic. Warren has fun mocking the book's cheesecake history while having fun with it.

As for Dazzler, that can be an interesting series. I loved it when it first came out (okay, as a kid I found her glamourous), found it to be a so-bad-it's-good pleasure as an adult and now I see it as a comic full of missed possibilities (that couldn't have succeeded at the time). When Marvel was accepting fan submissions, I was working on a Dazzler series that would have taken inspiration from Morrison's New X-Men and Milligan's X-Statix. It struck me that Dazzler would be an interesting person (especially from the mutant-as-gay-metaphor perspective) since she was the first mutant famous for something other than violent battles. I figured she must be a very compelling role model to any mutant who was struggling with self-acceptance but only had the X-Men and the Brotherhood as role models.

 
At 11:59 PM, Blogger Amy Reads said...

Hi Je M'Amuse,
There are moments when the assumption of being a mind-reader comes in handy, no doubt! It's a superpower that I've used as both parent and teacher.

That and the appearance of utter confidence :)

My experience has been that some kids tend to think that adults are omniscient. My theory is that it's kind of like playing peek-a-boo with a baby who hasn't acquired an awareness of permanance yet. Not sure if that makes sense to you . . Maybe it has something to do with the ego and the sense of being the center of the universe.

Having taught several age groups (all in the double digits, but some Very Young Indeed!), I don't think that perception is limited to children. I think it's a teacher/student thing, overall.
Like the moment when one of my older students (in her forties) apologized to me for falling asleep in class, but it had been a particularly tough day and night.
And I said, with all honesty, "you fell asleep in class?"
She honestly thought by looking around the entire room, I kept giving her dirty looks...
:)
Ciao,
Amy

 
At 12:04 AM, Blogger Amy Reads said...

Hi Lyle,
ust to clarify, I'd recommend Adam Warren's Gen-13 run, I'd mostly warn about the bulk of Gen-13 which was by Brandon Choi and Scott Campbell and is (part of) the basis for the stereotypical Image comic. Warren has fun mocking the book's cheesecake history while having fun with it.

Duly noted! Thanks again for the recommendation. As soon as life settles (around 2041, it feels like), I will check it out! :)

As for Dazzler, that can be an interesting series. I loved it when it first came out (okay, as a kid I found her glamourous), found it to be a so-bad-it's-good pleasure as an adult and now I see it as a comic full of missed possibilities (that couldn't have succeeded at the time).

You and Mr. Fanboy have utterly convinced me that I Completely Missed Out on Dazzler fandom. Who is this mysterious sparkly woman??


When Marvel was accepting fan submissions, I was working on a Dazzler series that would have taken inspiration from Morrison's New X-Men and Milligan's X-Statix. It struck me that Dazzler would be an interesting person (especially from the mutant-as-gay-metaphor perspective) since she was the first mutant famous for something other than violent battles. I figured she must be a very compelling role model to any mutant who was struggling with self-acceptance but only had the X-Men and the Brotherhood as role models.

First, Marvel was accepting fan submissions????
Second, could you speak more about your idea for Dazzler? I'm very curious! :) Feel free to email me if you'd rather not post it to the internets at large

serenitysignal at gmail dot com

Ciao,
Amy

 
At 2:08 PM, Blogger Lyle said...

For a little while Marvel had their "Epic" line which accepted fan submissions but disappeared after Bill Jemas left the company. A single one-shot came out of the effort.

My Dazzler proposal (I don't mind talking about it in public, I don't hold many hopes that it'd remain relevant long enough for me to break into the comic industry and have enough influence to get the series made... if I were into breaking into comics, which seems like too much work for too little reward... anyway, if a comic creator takes inspiration, I get to read my idea in print) was mostly going to be a soap opera about how mutants live day-to-day if they're not one of the big names. I would have played off of the original series' soap opera tendencies (the opening arc had Dazzler traveling to LA to visit her half-sister with her formerly-long-lost mother... later her sister would get framed for the murder of a movie producer who sexually harassed Alison) with a story of a cult celebrity learning that she's more appreciated than she realized (after her career fell apart she got married and moved to an alternate dimension).

One specific plot I remember from the opening arc would include the revelation that Alison's sister married a man who doesn't want her to use her mutant powers (no problem since her powers are only good for murder) and cut ties to her mutant sister (which was easy to agree when the sister wasn't in the same dimension).

The original Dazzler series is kinda like Xanadu. It's not good, but it is spectacular in whatever it accomplishes... especially with The Enchantress' grudge against her and the late series' awkward change of direction.

 
At 2:08 PM, Blogger Lyle said...

For a little while Marvel had their "Epic" line which accepted fan submissions but disappeared after Bill Jemas left the company. A single one-shot came out of the effort.

My Dazzler proposal (I don't mind talking about it in public, I don't hold many hopes that it'd remain relevant long enough for me to break into the comic industry and have enough influence to get the series made... if I were into breaking into comics, which seems like too much work for too little reward... anyway, if a comic creator takes inspiration, I get to read my idea in print) was mostly going to be a soap opera about how mutants live day-to-day if they're not one of the big names. I would have played off of the original series' soap opera tendencies (the opening arc had Dazzler traveling to LA to visit her half-sister with her formerly-long-lost mother... later her sister would get framed for the murder of a movie producer who sexually harassed Alison) with a story of a cult celebrity learning that she's more appreciated than she realized (after her career fell apart she got married and moved to an alternate dimension).

One specific plot I remember from the opening arc would include the revelation that Alison's sister married a man who doesn't want her to use her mutant powers (no problem since her powers are only good for murder) and cut ties to her mutant sister (which was easy to agree when the sister wasn't in the same dimension).

The original Dazzler series is kinda like Xanadu. It's not good, but it is spectacular in whatever it accomplishes... especially with The Enchantress' grudge against her and the late series' awkward change of direction.

 
At 1:38 PM, Blogger Amy Reads said...

Hi Lyle,
For a little while Marvel had their "Epic" line which accepted fan submissions but disappeared after Bill Jemas left the company. A single one-shot came out of the effort.

Ah, but that would have been a blast.

My Dazzler proposal (I don't mind talking about it in public, I don't hold many hopes that it'd remain relevant long enough for me to break into the comic industry and have enough influence to get the series made... if I were into breaking into comics, which seems like too much work for too little reward...

And I just found out that British writers are paid in American dollars, which mean they're making half of what they should be making, once you convert dollars into pounds. That is Too Much Work for Too Little Reward as well!

anyway, if a comic creator takes inspiration, I get to read my idea in print) was mostly going to be a soap opera about how mutants live day-to-day if they're not one of the big names. I would have played off of the original series' soap opera tendencies (the opening arc had Dazzler traveling to LA to visit her half-sister with her formerly-long-lost mother... later her sister would get framed for the murder of a movie producer who sexually harassed Alison) with a story of a cult celebrity learning that she's more appreciated than she realized (after her career fell apart she got married and moved to an alternate dimension).

Absolutely Brilliant, Friend. Thank you for sharing it with me :)

The original Dazzler series is kinda like Xanadu. It's not good, but it is spectacular in whatever it accomplishes... especially with The Enchantress' grudge against her and the late series' awkward change of direction.

And we all know my love of Xanadu and spectacle. But then, I was born and raised in New Orleans, so perhaps the love of spectacle is deep in my bones :)
Ciao,
Amy

 
At 12:37 AM, Blogger Blue Tyson said...

Jack Hawksmoor's King of Cities shtick is pretty cool, I think, alien abductions and all.

 
At 2:53 PM, Blogger marry said...

Blogs are so informative where we get lots of information on any topic. Nice job keep it up!!
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